Logitech g703 mouse: Logitech G703 Wireless Gaming Mouse

Logitech G703 LIGHTSPEED Mouse

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Logitech G703 Wireless Mouse



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Logitech G703 review: A mainstream wireless mouse with some exceptional features

Logitech’s new Powerplay system is an exciting proposition. What’s not to like about a mouse pad that charges your wireless mouse as you use it? Okay, maybe the high price ($100) and the fact that Powerplay is currently only available with two mice—the Logitech G703 and G903.

Obviously, you’ll need to know more about these mice in order to know if they make Powerplay worth it. In this article we’re going to take a look at the lower-end option: the G703 (which can be found on Amazon for $94), a rework of Logitech’s right-handed G403 Prodigy mouse, but with added Powerplay functionality. Or, for those who aren’t buying a $100 mouse pad (even if it is magic), think of this as a G403 with an optional 10 gram weight.

Let’s take a closer look.

This review is part of our roundup of best gaming mice. Go there for details on competing products and how we tested them.

The simple life

Note: I said the G703 is a rework of the wireless G403 Prodigy. I’m reiterating that fact because it’s bound to be confusing to fans of the old G700, which for a long time was one of the best wireless mice on the market. I think a lot of fans were holding out hope for a true G700 successor at some point during Logitech’s current generation of hardware, meaning more of an MMO-styled mouse with a ton of buttons on it.

IDG / Hayden Dingman

And maybe it’ll still happen someday, but it’s not this day. By contrast, the G703 is a very simple mouse—your standard left and right click, middle click/mouse wheel, and two oversized thumb buttons, plus a single button behind the mouse wheel that cycles between your dpi presets.

Combine that with the usual right-hand scoop shape, and the G703 is about the most unassuming and unadorned gaming mouse Logitech sells. It’s Logitech’s take on the “Classic Gaming Mouse”—you know, your DeathAdder/Pulsefire/Castor/Siege mouse. Every company has one, and for good reason: It’s about as average as average can get. Simple, inoffensive, familiar, and comfortable.

This rework of the G403 might’ve spawned a new model number, but from what I understand, the change is mostly academic. This is still the same ol’ mouse, but there was apparently confusion over having both wired and wireless G403 models. Logitech made the wireless one the G703 and voila, here we are.

IDG / Hayden Dingman

Actually, the G703 did pick up one new, important feature. In order to be Powerplay compatible, the G703 needed a slot on the bottom in which to insert the “Powercore.” We’ll talk more about that feature later, but suffice it to say the slot is there whether you buy Powerplay or not. If you don’t, you can remove the circle of plastic on the bottom of the mouse and replace it with an identical disc that contains an embedded 10 gram weight.

That feature seems admittedly more useful on the higher-end G903, which glides effortlessly across the mouse pad. I actually thought the G703 was the heavier mouse at first, due to how much it dragged while moving—but no, it’s actually 3 grams lighter than the G903 (107 versus 110).

It’s the feet that make the difference. Indeed, if there’s any feature that typifies the entry-level nature of the G703, I think it’s the feet. Most people don’t give much thought to what’s under the mouse, but it can be just as important as the weight, the balance, the sensor, etc. Compare the bottoms of the G703 and G903 here:

IDG / Hayden Dingman

See those glossy black sections that protrude from the bottom of each mouse? Those are the “feet,” made of low-friction material which helps a mouse glide. You can see how the feet of both mice differ. On the G903, those feet help it glide across the mouse pad in an exceptionally smooth manner.

The G703 has only two feet, and while they’re quite large (and curved on the edges) their placement on the two opposite ends of the mouse is noticeable. Put the G703 and G903 next to each other, move them around with the types of sweeping motions used in low-dpi scenarios, and even a layperson will sense how the G703 drags in the middle. There’s just that much more friction to overcome.

Is it unusable? Far from it, and a few may even prefer the G703. That drag allows for more precise movements, at the expense of slightly more effort. For my money though, I prefer the G903, or really any mouse that glides without a second thought.

IDG / Hayden Dingman

I’ve got other complaints too, but they’re similarly minor. The G703’s chassis feels lower-quality than the G903’s, its buttons aren’t as satisfying to click (particularly the thumb buttons), the mouse wheel is spongy and lacks the satisfying clunk of the G502/G903’s, and so on.

But it’s also $50 cheaper, and with a list price of $100, the G703 is one of the least expensive wireless mice on the market. It also wins the ergonomic war. Much as I like the G903’s specs, even a somewhat generic right-handed mouse is more comfortable than the most comfortable ambidextrous mouse, particularly in longer gaming sessions.

Now, the good parts

Don’t write the G703 off just yet. It’s got its strong points.

Those strong points include the sensor. The G703 might be the inexpensive option, but it still features the same PWM3366 sensor that Logitech uses in the G502, G903, and its other high-end mice. Beloved by many for its precision and consistency, the presence of the PWM3366 automatically puts the G703 in good company.

IDG / Hayden Dingman

It also uses Logitech’s proprietary “Lightspeed” wireless tech. Time was, a wireless mouse was verboten in gaming circles—prone to interference, plagued by bad sensors, people wanted wired mice because they were dependable. There’s also an assumed benefit to wired: speed. Surely nothing’s faster than an electric signal over a wired connection, right?

Well, conventional wisdom is wrong in that respect. Logitech’s proven that its Lightspeed wireless tech is actually faster (by milliseconds) than some wired competitors. The actual numbers don’t matter—again, we’re talking milliseconds. What matters is that Logitech’s wireless devices are now just as quick as well-respected wired mice. Aside from a quarter-second of dead time when I shake the mouse to wake it up, using the G703 is indistinguishable from using a wired mouse. I haven’t even had any problems with interference, and that’s in my signal-drenched, tech-filled apartment.

That’s true regardless of pairing method. Those of you who abstain from Powerplay and buy the G703 on its own will receive the usual USB dongle. Easy. Those who do opt for Powerplay will have the mouse pad itself as a Lightspeed receiver. The first time you turn on the mouse pad and mouse it’ll pair, and from there you should be good to go. I haven’t noticed any performance difference between the two methods.

Speaking of Powerplay, we should also talk battery before we wrap this up. That’s the whole reason we’re getting this rework of the wireless G403, after all.

IDG / Hayden Dingman

Using the G703 in its traditional, non-Powerplay mode, I got about two or three days of use before I needed to connect the included Micro USB cable and plug in the mouse. That matches Logitech’s figures, which list 24 hours of battery with the default lighting (or 30-plus if you go dark). Charging takes about two hours, so the mouse should be charged with time to spare if you plug it in overnight.

Why worry about cables at all, though? I’ve relegated a more thorough breakdown of Powerplay and its wireless charging tech to its own review, but here’s a quick rundown: After inserting the Powercore module into the bottom of the G703 you can expect the mouse to charge about 1 or 2 percent per hour as long as you’re using it—or around 5 to 6 percent if you leave it idle.

It’s slow, sure. If you need to be somewhere in an hour and don’t plan to take the mouse pad, you’ll probably want to plug in the G703 directly.

But if you’re sticking with Powerplay, it doesn’t matter. The mouse is perfectly usable while charging, and I managed to keep gaming the entire day while the G703 slowly reached capacity. After hitting 95 percent, the battery then briefly discharges, cycling perpetually between 85 and 95 percent for as long as you leave it on the mouse pad.

It works. A truly wireless mouse is finally here—one you’ll never need to plug in. If you’re willing to shell out the cash, of course.

With Powerplay limited to only two mice at the moment, the G703 is a pretty easy recommendation. If you prefer a right-handed mouse, or if you just don’t feel like shelling out $150 for the G903…well, this is your only option. And it’s a pretty good option, in large part thanks to that PWM3366 sensor. That brings a touch of high-end performance to what’s otherwise a fairly average, unassuming mouse.

If you’re not buying Powerplay, well, then the main attraction is price. At $100, the G703 comes in cheaper than pretty much every mainstream wireless mouse—most list for around $130, and while I think many are better mice than the G703, $30 is still $30.

But you have to be dead set on wireless if you’re buying the G703 sans-Powerplay. For $30 to $50 cheaper you could get a top-tier wired mouse, including Logitech’s own G502, the Mionix Naos 7000, and more. Are you willing to compromise on literally every other aspect of the mouse—weight, glide, even the way the clicks feel—and pay twice as much, just for wireless convenience? Something to ask yourself before purchasing.

Review of Logitech G703 wireless gaming mouse / Overclockers.ua

Several years ago, all eminent manufacturers tried to have at least one wireless mouse in their assortment. But everything pointed to the fact that wireless gaming peripherals would not “take off”, or rather, would not become mass. Either the moment was not chosen very well, or there were more restrictions in wireless games than advantages, in particular: the need to charge the battery, the weight of devices, delays in signal transmission and higher cost. Therefore, at the beginning of 2018, the main competition in this direction unfolded between Logitech and Razer, while the rest of the companies remained in the shadows and did not invest additional resources in the development of wireless gaming devices, leaving everything “as is”.

As a result, Logitech has such current devices as G903, G703, G603, G403 (wireless version). And Razer has Mamba (16K dpi), Lancehead, Atheris and Mamba HyperFlux. Common among all these devices is wireless technology, which allows you to get rid of delays in signal transmission. And the difference lies in solving the problem of charging the device – the Logitech G903 and G703 models have the ability to connect a POWERPLAY wireless charging module, which will be powered by a special mat, while the Razer Mamba HyperFlux comes immediately complete with a similar device and surface.

In this review, we will test the Logitech G703 wireless mouse, but without the wireless charging module (because it has not yet reached our edges). If in the future we have the opportunity to fill this gap, we will definitely use it.

Specifications

Model Logitech G703
Manufacturer website logitech.com
Interface Wired / Wireless (USB)
Type Gaming (FPS/MMO/RTS games)
Sensor type Optical
Sensor Model Pixart PMW3366DM-T2QU
Resolution cpi 200 – 12,000
Number of buttons 6 buttons (left, middle, right, resolution key, two side buttons)
Maximum acceleration, g 40
Lift-off height (LOD), mm 1-3 mm
Maximum speed, m/s 10. 16
USB port polling rate, Hz 125 / 250 / 500 / 1000
Frame rate, fps 12 000
Internal memory KB +
Scroll 1
Scroll vertical/horizontal +/-
Cord length, m 1.8
Wireless receiver type Nano receiver
Power supply, battery life Built-in lithium battery, 24-33 hours
Wireless Protocol (GHz) / Radius (m) 2.4 / 10
Variable weight + (up to 10 grams)
Adjustable body shape
Cable material Nylon braid
Housing surface material Plastic / Rubber
Color Black
Light + (RGB, 16.8 million colors)
Illumination zones Scroll wheel, stern logo
Leg material Teflon (PTFE)
Software + (Logitech Gaming Software)
Dimensions (L x W x H) mm 124 x 68 x 43
Weight g 107 (117 with weight)
Compatible with OS Windows 7 / 8 / 8. 1 / 10, Mac OS 10.10 or higher
Optional 10g weight for extra weight, supports POWERPLAY wireless charging module, built-in 32-bit ARM processor, power switch, extender for receiver, supports LIGHTSPEED 9 wireless technology0021
Average cost, $ 100

Delivery and packaging

The packaging of the mouse is generally discreet, without bright colors or flashy headings. Everything is very restrained, in gray and white shades, and only the name of the product is made in blue. The image of the device is front and back, the three main advantages of the mouse are listed on the back, and the technical specifications in German, English and French can be read on the side of the box.

Inside there is a blue plastic tray with a transparent top lid that neatly folds the product and accessories.

Includes mouse, detachable braided cable, 10g round weight, USB receiver, USB to Micro USB extension cable, and documentation.

Appearance and design

The Logitech G703 has a classic asymmetrical shape, inherited from the G403. The top panel is made of smooth, but rather tenacious and pleasant to the touch black plastic. The panels of the main keys are separate, but the gaps near them are minimal and they practically do not stagger. The resolution switch key is glossy, recessed into the recess between the LMB and RMB. It is pressed with little effort and a loud click.

Left sidewall fully rubberised. There is no relief on it, which is very good, because it significantly slows down the rate of accumulation of dirt and makes it easier to clean the mouse. Thumb grip is close to absolute, both dry and wet. Two large side keys are made of glossy plastic. They are easy to grope anyway, but on the back of the front button there is an additional tactile notch. The effort of pressing the keys is average, without a reserve of free play, the click when triggered is muffled.

From the front, the mouse looks fairly normal. In the middle is a special socket for connecting a USB cable, which is usually used for charging, but the mouse can also work on it without a receiver.

The signal cord does not have mechanical latches, but its specific fork-like shape fits snugly into the mouse’s mounting hole. And you can remove the connector only by pulling it with a decent effort. The anti-kink protection is rubber and completely straight, it does not cling to the surface. In general, such a system is good in that the USB connector does not loosen during regular connections / disconnections, as is often the case, for example, with smartphones. Turning off the manipulator when switching from wireless to wired mode and vice versa is not required, this operation can be performed on the fly and this is another indisputable plus for G703 users.

The USB signal cable is 1.8 meters long and has a nylon braid. Although it is thicker than average in cross section, it is quite soft and flexible. It does not hold the given shape and straightens quickly. On the side of the large USB connector, a small ferrite ring is put on the cord to eliminate signal interference.

LIGHTSPEED technology promises a signal transmission speed indistinguishable from a wired connection, but with one small caveat indicated directly in the instructions – the optimal distance at which the receiver should be from the mouse is 20 cm. And this is provided that wireless routers and other similar sources of electromagnetic interference are located more than 2 meters from the transmitter. Therefore, the manufacturer has provided a special adapter that allows you to connect the receiver to the charging cable and place it as close as possible to the mouse, improving the signal quality.

The convenience of the extension adapter is that you can easily remove the cable from it and connect the mouse to it directly if you need to charge it or if you want to use it in wired mode.

The two main buttons of the manipulator have practically no play, at most they can be slightly lifted up if pulled towards you. They work clearly, with an effort slightly below average and without a reserve of free play. The activation sound is also quite quiet – only a muffled click is heard. The MTBF resource for LKM and PKM is declared within 50 million clicks. The scroll wheel is rubberized, has transverse tactile notches around the entire perimeter. The LED backlight strip is located in the middle of it. The encoder here is mechanical, rather soft and quiet, but it clearly fulfills all wheel fixation positions. The middle mouse button is tight to press and has a loud activation sound.

The right side of the mouse is also fully rubberized and has no texture. There are no supports on this side, so the fingers can be positioned as convenient.

There is nothing special on the back, the contours of the mouse body are familiar and do without exotic curves. The G logo with built-in LED backlight is shifted almost to the middle of the top panel.

The shape of the G703 is intended for right-handers, although its asymmetry is not pronounced and, with some practice and extreme necessity, it can also be used with the left hand. Rubberized sidewalls allow you to comfortably hold the mouse in any type of grip, however, be aware that its body is large and best suited for large and medium-sized hands. The balance of weight along the axes is matched evenly, installing additional weight does not change anything in its distribution.

The base of the mouse has two large semi-circular Teflon feet on the front and back. The window of the Pixart PMW3366 optical sensor with invisible infrared illumination is located exactly in the center, a small oval leg is glued around it. There is a power switch to the right of the sensor.

The semi-circular door at the back is held on by magnets and opens when you press on the back of it. Then the front rises, for which the panel can be removed. Two magnets on the case are also contacts to which the POWERPLAY wireless charging module is connected.

To make the mouse heavier, you can use the complete weight of 10 grams – it is inserted from the back of the cover. To extract it, the lid has a small notch in its front part.

The mouse has two RGB lighting zones – a bar in the middle of the scroll wheel and a G logo on the back of the top panel. The backlight on the wheel performs an indicative function. When you turn on the mouse, it briefly glows red, yellow or green, indicating the level of charge of the built-in battery. The color reproduction in general looks good, except for the fact that instead of white, the diodes depict pale blue, and instead of yellow, light green. If battery saving is required, the backlight can be turned off via the driver.

Consider software.

Firmware

The G703 uses Logitech Gaming Software Universal Driver version 8.96.88 as software, mouse firmware version 14.0.4. The choice of interface language is available only once, when installing the program. The driver is registered at startup and is always active by default, although this can be disabled.

The driver’s basic screen shows which mouse buttons are active, the mouse’s battery level, and prompts you to choose whether to use the mouse’s memory or software settings. If you click on the cursor image, then we will get into the sensor settings.

The section of sensor settings and key assignments can be general or divided into two separate tabs (depending on whether the built-in memory or automatic software recognition mode is enabled). Six keys are available for reassigning commands. They can be assigned any mouse function, a standard combination of Windows buttons, or a complex macro. The macro is written in a separate window with minimal functionality – only keyboard commands are perceived, between which delays can be edited. Three profiles are available for the built-in memory to choose from, and in the case of using driver profiles, their number is unlimited. Sensor resolution is adjustable from 200 to 12000 dpi in 50 dpi increments. Five separate sensitivity levels can be set, one of which is assigned the “shift” function, that is, when you press a given key, this level is activated. You can choose from polling rates of 125, 250, 500 or 1000 Hz.

In the backlight settings, you can choose individually which of the two backlight zones will be turned on, select a lighting effect (static, color change or “breathing” mode), assign the brightness and speed of the effect. The color palette allows you to select any of the existing colors for highlighting. In addition, backlight settings can be synchronized with other devices of the company and saved in three separate profiles, in case of using the built-in memory.

The battery screen visually displays in percentage and hours exactly how much charge is left in the battery and where it is spent. There is also a quick backlight setting.

Surface Calibration is responsible for setting the minimum lift-off height (LOD) of the sensor. By default, there are two surface options available from Logitech and a default setting. The user can add his own surface, and then follow the steps suggested by the program to calibrate the mouse sensor for it.

The built-in heat map statistics module allows you to track which buttons are used most often, how many and how long they are held down.

This software can be linked to the popular program for streamers – Overwolf. And under the icon in the form of a gear, the settings tabs of the driver itself are hidden. The question mark icon sends the user to the instructions for this driver, straight to the manufacturer’s website.

Ergonomics and testing

The mouse was tested on a Razer Goliathus WoT (Speed ​​medium) mat in both wired and wireless modes. The ergonomics of the body of the Logitech G703 is more than usual and in many ways similar to the office mice of this manufacturer. The mouse just fits normally in the hand for any type of grip and that’s it, without any special features and the need to get used to it. However, the care for small details is visible in the finish – both rubberized sidewalls have no texture, and sit in the hand like a glove. The surface of the top panel is made of oleophobic material. Thanks to this, the manipulator gets dirty slowly and is easy to clean. The weight is small and well distributed along the axes, and a complete weight is not really required here. It will be useful only for those who like “heavier”. The main and side keys are responsive, without play and with good tactile feedback. Only the middle button let me down – for my taste it is pressed too tightly. But the scroll wheel is very pleasant – quiet, with precise locking positions, and comfortable texture. Unless the encoder in it is mechanical, and not optical, as is usually the case with Logitech. The friction force at the legs is average, without much inertia, especially if the mouse is additionally weighted. In a word, in terms of ergonomics, the G703 is comfortable, approximately like slippers.

The mouse stayed with me for two weeks. And most of that time it was used wirelessly. It takes approximately two hours to fully charge from a dry battery state using a conventional USB 2.0 port. The driver specifies an estimated run time of 34 hours without backlight and 24 hours with LEDs on. In fact, if you use it continuously without backlighting, and without turning off the power, for 10-12 hours a day, then the charge will stably last for three days. If you use the switch when idle, then this time will quite come out to stretch for a week. The sleep mode of the mouse is shallow, it wakes up at the slightest movement with a subtle activation delay. How quickly the sensor goes into low power mode, I was not able to establish exactly. This usually happened during long periods of inactivity in the range of 10 to 15 minutes. Although this parameter is not written anywhere in the driver and is not regulated, it is definitely not set up as aggressively as in office mice. As for using the mouse in wired mode, we can say that there is no difference. At least if the receiver is close. If you hide it away, then the delay increases, but it can only be measured instrumentally, it is not felt by the eye. The fact that the mouse does not need to be turned off when switching to wired mode and vice versa adds a special convenience. In the system, the mouse is recognized even before you have time to put it on the table. On the part of the backlight, as mentioned earlier, there are complaints about the display of white and yellow, although the rest of the palette looks good.

The mouse is equipped with a proprietary modification of the Pixart PMW3366 sensor, which today is the standard of quality among optical sensors. It does not show any difference when working in wired and wireless mode. It is not possible to cause the cursor to break. There are no spurious effects, although it should be noted that the level of smoothing increases as the maximum resolution is reached. The tear-off height is adjusted depending on the type of surface used, it cannot be set to zero, but what is there is quite enough so that the cursor practically does not move when the mouse is lifted from the surface.

Summary

The Logitech G703 is a great wireless gaming mouse. It combines a simple and practical body shape, quality materials and workmanship, the best optical sensor, good switches and scroll wheel, and a durable battery with wireless charging capability (with POWERPLAY module). The mouse can also work on a wire, if necessary, that is, it is not necessary to interrupt work while charging. And the process of changing the operating mode takes a few seconds. All this is complemented by the LIGHTSPEED wireless system, which provides the mouse in wireless mode with the same speed as in wired mode. Plus there is RGB lighting and the ability to change the weight of the device.

There are no critical flaws in the Logitech G703. But there are features that are worth paying attention to. First of all, the receiver should be located practically near the mat in order to achieve minimal delays in signal transmission. This is both convenient (the charging cable is always at hand) and not very aesthetically pleasing (an extra wire on the table). Secondly, the scroll wheel has a mechanical encoder, which is well implemented on its own, but less durable than the optical encoder found, for example, in the G903. Thirdly, backlight diodes cannot correctly reproduce white and yellow.

Pricing for the Logitech G703 mouse is mixed. On the one hand, the recommended price of $100 looks expensive. On the other hand, it is still much less than the nearest eminent competitors ask for similar solutions. Yes, and in the assortment of Logitech itself, the mouse occupies an average position in terms of cost. On the other hand, if the user wants to use the G703 with the mat and POWERPLAY wireless charging module, they will have to shell out another $100, which is already too much, but still cheaper than, for example, the Razer Mamba HyperFlux. Thus, it turns out that, as of today, the Logitech G703 is the most balanced offer in terms of price and quality in the wireless gaming mouse segment.

Logitech G703 Light Speed ​​mouse black optical (25600dpi) wireless USB (5but) – 1914919

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November 17, 2022

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Wireless mice

Mouse Logitech G703 Light Speed ​​black optical (25600dpi) wireless USB (5but)

Product code: 1914919
Manufacturer: LOGITECH

Manufacturer code: 910-005641
Availability: On request

Price: 7630 ₽

The price is indicated when buying for cash.
The offer is not a public offer.


Features
Key features
Technology optical
Sensor resolution, max.