Radiant space heaters: The 8 Best Radiant and Convection Space Heaters of 2023

The 8 Best Radiant and Convection Space Heaters of 2023

Our favorite is the Pelonis Ceramic Tower Space Heater

By

Erica Puisis

Erica Puisis

Erica Puisis writes about home products for The Spruce and specializes in interior design and plant care. She’s contributed to Forbes and smart home blogs like Smart Home Solver and TechDigg.

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Updated on 12/21/22

Fact checked by

Richard Scherr

Fact checked by
Richard Scherr

Rich Scherr is a seasoned technology and financial journalist who spent nearly two decades as the editor of Potomac and Bay Area Tech Wire. The Baltimore native also covered the technology scene for LocalBusiness.com and has been a regular contributor to the sports pages of The Baltimore Sun and The Washington Post.

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Editorial Process

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The Spruce / Rachel Marek

A space heater can provide you with warmth and comfort during chilly weather, while also helping to keep your energy bills low when it’s used as a supplemental heat source. Radiant and convection space heaters both accomplish this purpose, but they use two different heating methods. 

Larry Campbell, a master electrician and member of The Spruce Home Improvement Review Board, explains that convection heaters “include a fan that blows the heat in a chamber to get hotter and hotter to warm the air.” A ceramic element heater is an example of a convection heater, while an infrared quartz heater is a type of radiant heater. “A hot wire passes an electrical current through the quartz element to the ‘neutral’ side. That heat is radiant,” Campbell explains. It’s good for warming people and objects in the path of the radiant heat, but not as effective at raising the air temperature in a room.  

We researched and tested some of the top radiant and convection space heaters on the market and evaluated them on heating performance, design, safety, and effectiveness.

Here are the best radiant and convection space heaters on the market.

Our Top Picks

Best Overall, Convection:

Pelonis Tower Space Heater at Amazon

Best Overall, Radiant:

DeLonghi Oil-Filled Space Heater at Home Depot

Best Budget:

Kismile Space Heater at Amazon

Best Fireplace:

Duraflame 3D Infrared Electric Fireplace Stove at Amazon

Best for Large Spaces:

Honeywell ThermaWave 6 Ceramic Technology Space Heater at Amazon

Best Wall Mounted:

Heat Storm Phoenix Space Heater at Wayfair

Best Portable:

Dr. Infrared Heater Portable Space Heater at Amazon

Best Splurge:

Atomi Smart Wi-Fi Portable Heater at Amazon

In This Article

  • Our Picks

  • What to Look for

  • FAQ

  • Why Trust The Spruce

Amazon

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    5/5

  • Design

    5/5

  • Safety

    5/5

  • Value

    4/5

What We Like

  • Space-saving tower design

  • Heater housing doesn’t become overly hot

  • Digital control panel with remote control 

  • Oscillation feature

What We Don’t Like

The Pelonis Ceramic Tower Space Heater is our top recommendation for a convection space heater. This type of space heater gradually warms the air in the room by sending hot air to the ceiling and warming the cooler air that the heater takes in near the floor. When testing this ceramic heater in our lab, we found that it did an excellent job of evenly distributing heat and felt the warmth on all sides, not only in front. At the same time, the heater’s housing didn’t become hot to the touch, which is a common concern about using space heaters around children and pets. Plus, it includes a remote for easy control of the unit from anywhere in the room. 

This heater’s digital display makes it simple to set a target temperature up to 92 degrees Fahrenheit. It operates on High, Low, or Eco mode and also includes an eight-hour timer. We found that, like other tower-style heaters, this heater has a small footprint, which is helpful in compact spaces. We also appreciated the oscillating feature, although we wish it had a fan-only mode so we could use it year-round.

It’s worth noting that this heater does not come with a manual, and we had to resort to a bit of trial-and-error to figure out some of the features. However, this heater impressed us with its heating performance and safety features, like a tip-over switch and automatic overheating shut-off.

Price at time of publish: $75

Dimensions: 7.1 x 7.1 x 22.95 inches | Heating Element: Ceramic | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 6.29 pounds | Safety Features: Overheat protection, tip-over shutoff

The Home Depot

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What We Like

What We Don’t Like

A radiant space heater delivers heat into the room, even after the heater is shut off. Oil-filled radiator-style space heaters, like the DeLonghi Oil Filled Space Heater, are a tried-and-true way of raising the temperature of a room in an economical way. We recommend this radiant space heater for its quiet operation, notable safety features, and sturdy, portable design. 

The DeLonghi TRD50615E has a sealed, oil-filled reservoir that never needs refilling. The heater warms the oil inside of the reservoir, and this heat is radiated into the room. Even after the unit turns off, the residual warmth continues to be released. You can modify the operation of this radiant heater by setting a target temperature and choosing from four power levels (Min, Med, Max, and Eco), or setting a 24-hour timer with up to two temperature settings. While the digital display is not self-explanatory, the user manual provides helpful information on what the icons represent and guides you through the various features and functions.

Radiant oil-filled space heaters aren’t as compact or portable as some other options, but DeLonghi equips this model with four wheels so that it can be moved from room to room. It also checks several boxes for safety features: overheat protection, tip-over shut-off, and a child lock. 

Price at time of publish: $160

Dimensions: 26.1 x 10.3 x 16.4 inches | Heating Element: Oil-Filled | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 26. 6 pounds | Safety Features: Tip-over shutoff, child lock, overheat protection

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    4/5

  • Design

    4/5

  • Safety

    5/5

  • Value

    5/5

What We Like

  • Heats up very quickly

  • Simple dial controls are easy to use

  • Tip-over shutoff and overheat protection

What We Don’t Like

Small but mighty is how we’d describe the Kismile Portable Electric Space Heater after testing it in our Lab. Despite its compact size, it heats up quickly and is ideal for use as a personal space heater or for a small, confined space—like under a desk or sewing table—since we noted that the heat is concentrated in the front of the heater.

While this affordable choice offers no digital display or remote, the dial controls are clearly labeled and easy to turn. One of the dials offers a low, heat, and fan-only setting, while the other allows you to control the power level of each of those settings. This fan offers safety features, including overheat production and tip-over shutoff. In fact, our tester noted that “the heater shuts off with the slightest nudge.” They added, “There is a trigger on the bottom of the unit that shuts off when tipped in any direction!” However, if you are looking for a quiet heater, this is not the best option, as the fan noise was our biggest complaint during testing.

Price at time of publish: $28

Dimensions: 7.28 x 6.5 x 9.65 inches | Heating Element: Convection | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 3.43 pounds | Safety Features: Tip-over shutoff, Overheat protection

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    5/5

  • Design

    5/5

  • Safety

    4/5

  • Value

    5/5

What We Like

What We Don’t Like

Duraflame Infrared Quartz Fireplace Stove Review

For a functional yet aesthetic space heater, we recommend the Duraflame 3D Infrared Electric Fireplace. Available in a range of colors to match your decor, it features realistic-looking flames, logs, and embers with adjustable brightness settings. We tested the heater’s function on all settings and found the heat output to be worthy of 5 stars. 

The infrared quartz heating element works in conjunction with an adjustable thermostat that can be set from 62 to 82 degrees Fahrenheit. To understand how an infrared quartz element works, Campbell, a master electrician and member of The Spruce Home Improvement Review Board explains that it’s “like a lightbulb that gets hot and that radiates the heat.” This heater also has a timer setting that can be adjusted from 30 minutes to nine hours. We like that the realism of the fireplace space heater is enhanced by the fact that the heater’s controls are hidden behind the fireplace door. It comes with a remote control so you don’t need to leave the couch to change the settings, although we found the features to be a little confusing to use at first.

The Duraflame 3D Infrared Electric Fireplace is more expensive than many of the other heaters we tested, but we found that it’s worth the price, since you can use it year-round for a cozy ambiance without the heat. “This would not only be useful as a heater but is decorative and would be nice on a porch or smaller room,” our tester noted. It’s equipped with a sensor to shut-off the unit if it overheats, but the front grille of the space heater can get very warm. However, the sides and body of the heater weren’t overly warm to the touch.  

Price at time of publish: $300

Dimensions: 24 x 12.9 x 23.4 inches | Heating Element: Infrared quartz | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 28 pounds | Safety Features: Overheating protection

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

The 9 Best Electric Fireplaces of 2023

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    5/5

  • Design

    4.5/5

  • Safety

    5/5

  • Value

    5/5

What We Like

What We Don’t Like

The Honeywell ThermaWave 6 is an outstanding option for heating large spaces, thanks to its directional heat output, user-friendly digital controls, and well-engineered safety features. When testing this space heater, it raised the temperature on the thermostat by 4 degrees in 30 minutes. We were also impressed by the discernible difference between the heat output on low and high settings, an area of performance where some other heaters fell short. However, note that its heating power will create a draw on your power supply, compared to other heaters we tested, as we noted that “the watts per hour of use was higher than the general 1.5 threshold.” 

During testing, we noted that the vents can be directed straight ahead or upward, which is helpful for directing the airflow around a large room. However, we did wish they could be directed downward towards the floor to warm our feet.

Our favorite feature of the Honeywell ThermaWave 6 is the digital controls, with options for pre-programmed temperature settings ranging from 65 to 80 degrees and a fan-only function. “The control panel is easy to use and intuitive with well-marked icons that are illuminated when in use,” our tester noted. There is a tip-over switch that disables the unit if it’s tipped in any direction, along with two overheating sensors, and cool-touch plastic housing. The built-in handle on the back of the heater stays cool and has a nice grip, which makes the unit easy to move. 

Price at time of publish: $91

Dimensions: 24 x 12.9 x 23.4 inches | Heating Element: Ceramic | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 13.17 pounds | Safety Features: Automatic timer shut-off, overheat protection, tip-over shutoff, and cool-touch housing

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

The 9 Best Ceramic Heaters

Bed Bath & Beyond

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    4/5

  • Design

    4. 5/5

  • Safety

    4.5/5

  • Value

    4.5/5

What We Like

What We Don’t Like

Of all the radiant and convection space heaters we tested in the Lab, the Heat Storm Phoenix Infrared Space Heater is our top pick for a wall-mounted option. We like that it has a thin profile, so it won’t take up much space on a wall. Its versatile design allows you to use it on the floor as well by attaching the included feet. We found the feet to be a bit flimsy during testing, but they did keep the unit stable.

Heating performance was most impressive on high with this space heater. Our tester noted that there wasn’t much heat generated on the low setting, but it also may have been because the heater’s target temperature and air temperature were similar. With this in mind, the heater earns 4 stars for heating performance. It operates quietly and has a variety of settings, which you can control using the included remote. This is an important feature for a wall-mounted heater, which may make the controls difficult to reach. The remote is small, and it took multiple presses of a button to activate the features.

Price at time of publish: $120

Dimensions: 18 3/4 x 4 1/2 x 12 3/4 inches | Heating Element: Infrared quartz | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 8 pounds | Safety Features: Tip-over shutoff, overheating protection, child lock, cool-touch housing

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    5/5

  • Design

    2/5

  • Safety

    5/5

  • Value

    5/5

What We Like

What We Don’t Like

Dr. Infrared Heater’s Portable Space Heater Quells Any Chill

Stay warm in any room with the help of a portable space heater, like this model from Dr. Infrared. It combines convection and infrared heating technology to heat spaces up to 1,000 square feet and is equipped with wheels for better mobility.

When testing the Dr. Infrared Portable Space Heater, we found that it emits a steady heat source. It was capable of raising the temperature in a large primary bedroom to 70 degrees in less than 30 minutes, despite nearly freezing outdoor temperatures. However, during our Lab testing, the low and high settings didn’t result in dramatically different heat output.

The safety features of this heater add to our confidence in recommending it as a portable space heater. The wheels, while handy for rolling it from one room to another, also mean that it’s harder to tip over when compared to tall, tower-like space heaters. But in case it were to tip over, it has an automatic shut-off.

Price at time of publish: $130

Dimensions: 12 1/2 x 17 x 13 inches | Heating Element: Infrared quartz and ceramic | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 25 pounds | Safety Features: Tip-over shutoff, overheating protection, automatic timer shut-off

The Spruce / Sage McHugh

The 7 Best Infrared Heaters of 2023

Amazon

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Our Ratings

  • Heating Performance

    4. 5/5

  • Design

    5/5

  • Safety

    4.5/5

  • Value

    4.5/5

What We Like

What We Don’t Like

A smart space heater is worth the spend for the convenience and handy features it offers. The Atomi Smart Wireless Tabletop Heater impressed us with its touchscreen digital display, resulting in a 5-star rating for design. The heater also sends notifications through its app and allows you to remotely control the unit, using the app or Amazon Alexa and Google Home. It costs over $60 but is a great addition to your smart home and does its job to warm you up.

Of course, the smart features are handy to have, but only if the space heater actually works. The good news is that our tester found it to function efficiently and effectively. After five minutes, our tester described the unit as quick to heat up and reported a noticeable increase in body temperature. It offers other useful features, like an option to oscillate and an eco-mode for energy savings. It has a tip-over shutoff that functioned well when tested, along with an overheating sensor and a red light to indicate when the heater is active (or still warm from use).

Note that the housing of the heater was warm to the touch during testing (although not too hot), and we detected a smell when the heater was operating on high. We also had a hard time locating the unit on the app, but once we did get it set up, it was easy to control using our phones.

Price at time of publish: $86

Dimensions: 8.27 x 9.06 x 18.11 inches | Heating Element: Ceramic | Wattage: 1500W | Weight: 4.6 pounds | Safety Features: Tip-over shutoff, app notifications

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

Final Verdict

The Pelonis Ceramic Tower Space Heater is our top recommendation for a convection space heater. In our testing, we found that it does an excellent job of distributing warm air around the room and it has a digital touchscreen and remote control. On the other hand, a radiant space heater like the DeLonghi TRD50615E Oil-Filled Space Heater will prove to be a source of long-lasting heat. This model has digital controls and wheels that make it easy to move from room to room, and it operates quietly.

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

Heater Type

Space heaters are classified by their heating mechanisms. There are two primary types of space heater: convection and radiant. If you want to use a space heater as a supplemental heat source to warm a room, look for a convection-type heater. For example, our top convection heater is the Pelonis Ceramic Tower Space Heater. If you’re looking for a space heater to warm up people or objects directly, then pick a radiant-type heater. It’s a better choice in large, open spaces or rooms with a draft where it may be a challenge to warm the ambient air temperature. Our favorite choice for a radiant heater, the DeLonghi Oil Filled Space Heater, is a radiator-style heater that is on wheels, so you can move it from room to room when needed.

Size

Most space heaters are relatively compact in size, although personal space heaters will be the smallest option and fit well under a desk or table, like the Kismile Portable Electric Space Heater, our best budget option. Space heaters for medium- to large-size rooms will have larger heating elements and naturally will be bigger in size. Our best pick for a larger space is the Honeywell ThermaWave 6, which warmed our testing space by 4 degrees in only 30 minutes.

You should match the size of a space heater to the room it will be used in, keeping in mind that a compact, personal-size space heater won’t do much to warm a large, open space, while a bigger space heater may quickly overpower a small room with too much heat. 

Consider not just the dimensions of a space heater but also its weight, especially if you’re looking for a space heater that is portable enough to move around. Some larger space heaters are equipped with wheels to make moving them easier, like our pick for the best portable space heater, the Dr. Infrared. 

Safety Features

Don’t overlook the importance of safety features when choosing a space heater for your home. The National Fire Protection Association recommends that a heater have a thermostat and an automatic shutoff if the unit overheats. Many heaters also feature a shutoff mechanism if the heater tips over, which is also recommended by the NFPA. These features are important if you have children or pets in the home, since they could accidentally knock the space heater over. Cool-touch housing is something to consider, since it reduces the possibility of being burned by a space heater that has become hot to the touch from use.

Heat Output

The heat output of a space heater is measured in watts. Most residential space heaters have a maximum heat output of 1,500 watts, including all of the heaters on this list. Some of these heaters offer a high and low setting, with the low setting usually outputting 750 watts of power, according to Larry Campbell, a master electrician and member of The Spruce Review Board.

The Spruce / Rachel Marek

FAQ

  • A radiant heater puts out heat that is absorbed by people or objects in front of the heater. A convection space heater warms the air in a room, so it will gradually raise the room’s temperature. 

  • That depends on your purpose for operating the heater. In a large room, it may take a convection space heater a long time and a lot of energy to effectively increase the temperature of the room. In this instance, a radiant heater to provide warmth you can feel would likely be the more efficient choice. However, if you’re trying to use zone heating to warm a room and reduce the run time of your house furnace, then a convection space heater will be more efficient.

  • Radiant and convection heaters measure their heat output in watts. Campbell says that “low settings are normally 750 watts, and high settings are 1500 watts.” In terms of temperature, most space heaters with an adjustable thermostat can be set to a temperature in the mid-80 degree Fahrenheit range, while some options go even higher. Our pick for the best overall convection space heater, the Pelonis Ceramic Tower Space Heater, has a maximum temperature setting of 92 degrees Fahrenheit. 

  • Infrared space heaters produce radiant heat. But not all radiant heaters are infrared. For example, the DeLonghi TRD50615E, our pick for the best radiant space heater, is an oil-filled model that radiates heat.

This article was written by Erica Puisis, who has covered heating and cooling products on The Spruce since 2019. She compiled picks for this article by using testing insights from the Lab and at-home product testers who put some of the most popular radiant and convection space heaters through their paces. Products were compared based on their design, safety features, heating performance, and other factors that affect usability. Larry Campbell, a master electrician and member of The Spruce Review Board, also shared information on the various types of space heaters, along with information about their heating mechanisms and wattages.

The 11 Best Space Heaters of 2023, Tested and Reviewed

The Spruce uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. National Fire Protection Association. Electric Portable Space Heater Safety.

Radiant Heating | Department of Energy

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Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer — the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel from the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating.

Radiant heating has a number of advantages. It is more efficient than baseboard heating and usually more efficient than forced-air heating because it eliminates duct losses. People with allergies often prefer radiant heat because it doesn’t distribute allergens like forced air systems can. Hydronic (liquid-based) systems use little electricity, a benefit for homes off the power grid or in areas with high electricity prices. Hydronic systems can use a wide variety of energy sources to heat the liquid, including standard gas- or oil-fired boilers, wood-fired boilers, solar water heaters, or a combination of these sources. For more on the different types of energy sources and heat distribution systems for home heating, explore our Energy Saver 101 infographic on home heating.

Despite its name, radiant floor heating depends heavily on convection, the natural circulation of heat within a room as air warmed by the floor rises. Radiant floor heating systems are significantly different from the radiant panels used in walls and ceilings. For this reason, the following sections discuss radiant floor heat and radiant panels separately.

Radiant Floor Heat

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There are three types of radiant floor heat — radiant air floors (air is the heat-carrying medium), electric radiant floors, and hot water (hydronic)

radiant floors. You can further categorize these types by installation. Those that make use of the large thermal mass of a concrete slab floor or lightweight concrete over a wooden subfloor are called “wet installations,” and those in which the installer “sandwiches” the radiant floor tubing between two layers of plywood or attaches the tubing under the finished floor or subfloor are called “dry installations.”

Types of Radiant Floor Heat

Air-Heated Radiant Floors

Air cannot hold large amounts of heat, so radiant air floors are not cost-effective in residential applications, and are seldom installed. Although they can be combined with solar air heating systems, those systems suffer from the obvious drawback of only producing heat in the daytime, when heating loads are generally lower. The inefficiency of trying to heat a home with a conventional furnace by pumping air through the floors at night outweighs the benefits of using solar heat during the day. Although some early solar air heating systems used rocks as a heat-storage medium, this approach is not recommended (see solar air heating systems).

Electric Radiant Floors

Electric radiant floors typically consist of electric heating cables built into the floor. Systems that feature electrical matting mounted on the subfloor below a floor covering such as tile are also available.

Because of the relatively high cost of electricity, electric radiant floors are usually only cost-effective if they include a significant thermal mass such as a thick concrete floor and your electric utility company offers time-of-use rates. Time-of-use rates allow you to “charge” the concrete floor with heat during off-peak hours (approximately 9 p.m. to 6 a.m.). If the floor’s thermal mass is large enough, the heat stored in it will keep the house comfortable for eight to ten hours without any further electrical input, particularly when daytime temperatures are significantly warmer than nighttime temperatures. This saves a considerable amount of money compared to heating at peak electric rates during the day.

Electric radiant floors may also make sense for home additions if it would be impractical to extend the heating system into the new space. However, homeowners should examine other options, such as mini-split heat pumps, which operate more efficiently and have the added advantage of providing cooling.

Hydronic Radiant Floors

Hydronic (liquid) systems are the most popular and cost-effective radiant heating systems for heating-dominated climates. Hydronic radiant floor systems pump heated water from a boiler through tubing laid in a pattern under the floor. In some systems, controlling the flow of hot water through each tubing loop by using zoning valves or pumps and thermostats regulates room temperatures. The cost of installing a hydronic radiant floor varies by location and depends on the size of the home, the type of installation, the floor covering, remoteness of the site, and the cost of labor.

Types of Floor Installations

Whether you use heating cables or tubing, the methods of installing electric and hydronic radiant systems in floors are similar.

So-called “wet” installations embed the cables or tubing in a solid floor and are the oldest form of modern radiant floor systems. The tubing or cable can be embedded in a thick concrete foundation slab (commonly used in “slab” ranch houses that don’t have basements) or in a thin layer of concrete, gypsum, or other material installed on top of a subfloor. If concrete is used and the new floor is not on solid earth, additional floor support may be necessary because of the added weight. You should consult a professional engineer to determine the floor’s carrying capacity.

Thick concrete slabs are ideal for storing heat from solar energy systems, which have a fluctuating heat output. The downside of thick slabs is their slow thermal response time, which makes strategies such as night or daytime setbacks difficult if not impossible. Most experts recommend maintaining a constant temperature in homes with these types of heating systems.

Due to recent innovations in floor technology, so-called “dry” floors, in which the cables or tubing run in an air space beneath the floor, have been gaining in popularity, mainly because a dry floor is faster and less expensive to build. Because dry floors involve heating an air space, the radiant heating system needs to operate at a higher temperature.

Some dry installations involve suspending the tubing or cables under the subfloor between the joists. This method usually requires drilling through the floor joists to install the tubing. Reflective insulation must also be installed under the tubes to direct the heat upward. Tubing or cables may also be installed from above the floor, between two layers of subfloor. In these instances, liquid tubing is often fitted into aluminum diffusers that spread the water’s heat across the floor in order to heat the floor more evenly. The tubing and heat diffusers are secured between furring strips, which carry the weight of the new subfloor and finished floor surface.

At least one company has improved on this idea by making a plywood subfloor material manufactured with tubing grooves and aluminum heat diffuser plates built into them. Such products also allow for the use of half as much tubing or cabling, because the heat transfer of the floor is greatly improved compared with more traditional dry or wet floors.

Floor Coverings

Ceramic tile is the most common and effective floor covering for radiant floor heating, because it conducts heat well and adds thermal storage. Common floor coverings like vinyl and linoleum sheet goods, carpeting, or wood can also be used, but any covering that insulates the floor from the room will decrease the efficiency of the system.

If you want carpeting, use a thin carpet with dense padding and install as little carpeting as possible. If some rooms, but not all, have a floor covering, then those rooms should have a separate tubing loop to make the system heat these spaces more efficiently. This is because the water flowing under the covered floor will need to be hotter to compensate for the floor covering. Wood flooring should be laminated wood flooring instead of solid wood to reduce the possibility of the wood shrinking and cracking from the drying effects of the heat.

Radiant Panels

Wall- and ceiling-mounted radiant panels are usually made of aluminum and can be heated with either electricity or with tubing that carries hot water, although the latter creates concerns about leakage in wall- or ceiling-mounted systems. Most commercially available radiant panels for homes are electrically heated.

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Like any type of electric heat, radiant panels can be expensive to operate, but they can provide supplemental heating in some rooms or can provide heat to a home addition when extending the conventional heating system is impractical.

Radiant panels have the quickest response time of any heating technology and — because the panels can be individually controlled for each room—the quick response feature can result in cost and energy savings compared with other systems when rooms are infrequently occupied. When entering a room, the occupant can increase the temperature setting and be comfortable within minutes. As with any heating system, set the thermostat to a minimum temperature that will prevent pipes from freezing.

Radiant heating panels operate on a line-of-sight basis — you’ll be most comfortable if you’re close to the panel. Some people find ceiling-mounted systems uncomfortable because the panels heat the top of their heads and shoulders more effectively than the rest of their bodies.

Radiant heating: as nature intended

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Recommended products

Today there are many types of heating systems: various boilers, convectors, stoves, heat pumps. Later than others, infrared heaters operating on the principle of radiant heating appeared on the domestic market. Most often, this heating system is mounted on the ceiling and walls of the room.

Radiant heating is based on the direct heating of the surfaces of a room and objects in it. The air is heated by the warm surface of the surrounding objects, so when using a radiant heating system, no additional costs for warming up the air are required.

The infrared heater is the main component of radiant heating. It, as a rule, is a rectangular steel device, which is coated with heat-resistant paint. On the side facing the floor, there is a reflective plate with a heating element. On the back of the heater is a mounting system.

Many heaters have a fire resistant heat insulator located between the housing and the reflective panel. Only 10% of the energy is spent on heating the air that comes into contact with the heating plate. The rest are 90% of energy is directed towards surfaces or people that need to be heated.

Models of infrared heaters “Frico” (Sweden), Almak (Russia), AEG (Germany) and others are widely represented on the Russian market.

Zebra – modular infrared heater

Ideal for heating country houses and other residential premises is the use of radiant energy from electric heating elements, which are called Zebra. This radiant heating system is convenient as the main heating system, usually mounted on the ceiling, then sewn up with almost any building decor.

It can also be used as an additional type of heating, placed in localized heating areas, such as at a window, at an entrance, above a workplace, or it can be used as infrared underfloor heating. Installation of the system does not take much time, for example, to mount this heating in a house of 100 m2, it takes only 2-3 days.

More about Zebra EVO-300

Where radiant heating is used

  • Apartments, cottages, private houses and other residential premises.
  • Verandas, loggias, balconies, winter gardens, greenhouses, conservatories.
  • Health and education institutions.
  • Places of public use, catering establishments, railway stations, shops, office and administrative premises.
  • Industrial and warehouse premises.
  • Change houses, temporary houses, wagons, households. buildings, saunas.
  • Service stations, garages, paint shops.

Easy installation and operation, high efficiency, safety, reliability and durability make the radiant heating system more and more in demand.

Similar articles

  • Heating systems in your home
  • Warm ceilings plan – modern heating
  • Underfloor heating under tiles: comfort and convenience
  • Electric heaters “Zebra”: economical heat for your comfort

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Shvabe – Products – Infrared neonatal heater “Radiant Heat-BONO” with phototherapy function

Heat that brings health

  • compactness
  • efficiency
  • economy
  • durability
  • functionality

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The heater is designed to be used as the main or additional source of heat for newborns during resuscitation, as well as for superintense phototherapy of newborns in obstetric institutions, perinatal centers, specialized centers and research institutes for the protection of motherhood and childhood.